A peace agreement between the government and the Central African armed groups was “obtained” on Saturday in Khartoum, the Central African government announced on its Twitter account.

“A peace agreement was obtained at the moment in Khartoum,” the government said, saying it “should be initialed tomorrow” Sunday and signed “in Bangui in a few days.”

This agreement was confirmed by the Commissioner of the African Union (AU) for Peace and Security, Smaïl Chergui, who tweeted that it had been obtained by “the government and the 14 armed groups” represented in the Khartoum negotiations .

However, he added: “We are refining the draft agreement, which is almost universally accepted.”

“We are pleased that a consensus has been reached on the stumbling blocks of amnesty and an inclusive government,” said Aboubakar Sidik, a spokesman for one of the main armed groups. Popular Front for the Renaissance of the Central African Republic ( FPRC )

The Khartoum peace talks, which began on Jan. 25, were suspended on Thursday because of disagreements, particularly over the question of amnesty for those responsible for crimes and abuses.

Under the pressure of its Western partners, Bangui has always refused an amnesty for warlords, many of whom are under UN sanctions or cited for human rights violations in NGO reports .

The Khartoum peace initiative did not put an end to all the violence on the ground. Since January 24, the armed group Unit for Peace in the Central African Republic ( UPC ) has led several attacks in the prefecture of Ouaka, in the center of the country.

Seven peace agreements have already been signed since the beginning of the Central African crisis at the end of 2012, with none of them succeeding in bringing stability back.