Yaoundé has launched a national disarmament program in conflict zones in the Far North and the English-speaking regions of Cameroon, announced the Cameroonian presidency.

A “national committee for disarmament, demobilization and reintegration” ( CNDDR ) for combatants in conflict zones in Cameroon (…) was created by presidential decree “, according to the terms of a statement signed Friday by President Paul Biya and received Saturday by AFP .

The CNDDR must allow to “welcome and disarm the ex-combatants” of the Islamist group “Boko Haram and the armed groups of the (Anglophone) regions of North-West and South-West”, to “collect” their weapons, and to “help reintegration into civilian life”, according to the document.

Based in Yaoundé, the committee will be chaired by Prime Minister Philémon Yang and will have centers in Bamenda and Buea, chief towns of the English-speaking regions, as well as in Mora, one of the main cities of the Far North where Boko Haram is raging.

This decree was promulgated in a context where incidents multiply in English-speaking regions in the midst of a conflict between the army and separatists. On 6 November, President Biya called on the secessionists to lay down their arms.

The latest attack by the Boko Haram group left 29 injured in Amchidé (Far-North), where a woman committed suicide bombings in the city near the border with Nigeria, the home country of the jihadist group. .

Attacks by the Boko Haram group have been on the increase for several months in the Lake Chad region, which includes Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon.

The heads of state of Nigeria, Niger and Chad, as well as the Cameroonian Prime Minister, met Thursday in camera in N’Djamena to discuss the fight against the jihadist group.

On this occasion, they called for more “support” from the international community and said they wanted to “change their approach in the fight against Boko Haram”.

Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration policies, known as DDR , are common processes in conflict-ridden countries.

For example, in 2017, the Central African Republic launched its DDR program for armed groups operating in the country, with no real success so far.