Rajery’s caravan, a flexible gifted artist

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Malagasy Rajery meets different musicians due to its new undertaking. © ayeayefilms

Germain Randrianarisoa, 57, mentioned that Rajery, winner of the 2002 RFI Musiques du Monde Prize, will current a brand new undertaking in early 2022, a documentary – reflections of his creative and political convictions.

Caravan Rajery 2021, as the brand new undertaking is known as “the prince of valiha”, as he will get the nickname right here on the Big Island. This group of about fifteen individuals (musicians, engineers, videographer …) crossed a number of areas of Madagascar in a minibus for a month and a half, from June to July.

The aim? Raising kids’s consciousness of the significance of local weather change first, archiving and amassing conventional music “to provide cultural references to the younger generation” then, Rajery explains with a smile. A giant firm that took him from the east coast to the intense south of the island, by way of the Hauts-Plateaux mountains, and which can outcome in a documentary. The launch is scheduled for early 2022. “The director, Anatole Razafy, is already in the process of editing,” says Rajery.

The consciousness section, referred to as the “Tree of Life”, revolves round schooling about local weather change for youngsters. Awareness that goes by means of a dialogue between native artists and college students, and naturally by means of music.

Environmental issues

Environmental preparedness has all the time been certainly one of the musician’s considerations. His first album is known as Feu de brousse bush fires is a outcome of cut-and-burn crops to regenerate farmland and is very fashionable in Madagascar. “A heresy,” in keeping with the artist, as a result of these bushfires trigger the lack of hundreds of acres of forest annually.

“I have been sensitive to climate change since I was little,” he provides. “I recently moved to Ambohimanga (a sacred hill not far from the capital Antananarivo), where I was born, Rajery explains with a smile. I have a plantation modest, and the water level there is constantly falling. It is alarming.”

Rajery has gathered forty years of apply of valiha, a tubular bamboo harp typical of Hauts-Plateaux. This instrument symbolizes for him the significance of the atmosphere, by means of its uncooked materials, but additionally its method of transmitting, exterior the language. “The kids are fantastic. It actually is the long run of our generations. I even have labored rather a lot with kids because the 90’s. Street kids, I adopted the Zazakanto choir … How to develop your nation should you have no idea his kids? He breathes.

For Rajery, this implies educating them easy and concrete actions, which they’ll anchor of their every day lives. Like not throwing garbage with sweets in nature. Or plant timber.

Musical heritage

As a part of the archiving and assortment of music, Rajery went on to acquire probably the most stunning songs by the artists who make Madagascar well-known. In Tamatave, he met Berthon Valiha, the well-known instrumentalist, Zily (a mom who performs the accordion), Tsoupla, a kabosy participant….

For Rajery, it will be important to maintain Madagascar’s musical heritage and supply “benchmarks for the young generation”. “I see that many contemporary Malagasy artists are inspired across the Atlantic, or on the African continent, but they also have to look at the richness of our cultural heritage. From one region to another, the rhythm, the sound changes so much!”

Once there, the shootings took between three and 4 days. The archiving and mastering of music has already been accomplished. On Saturday, September 11, on the event of his opera Hazo Aina, an opera to sentence the environmental injury in Madagascar, Rajery previewed an excerpt from his caravan in 2021.

Rajery’s Facebook web page

© ayeayefilms

Malagasy Rajery meets different musicians due to its new undertaking. .

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